#BZFriday: Helping a Neighbor in Need

From Navy Judge Advocate General Corps Public Affairs Last month, while leaving a restaurant on a cold afternoon in Waukegan, Ill., two JAG community members – Lt. Daniel Moore and […]

From Navy Judge Advocate General Corps Public Affairs

Last month, while leaving a restaurant on a cold afternoon in Waukegan, Ill., two JAG community members – Lt. Daniel Moore and LT. Daniel Phipps – noticed a woman in distress.

They did what their sense of duty called them to do, what felt right – they did what their training equipped them to do. They immediately approached her and offered their assistance.

Moore and Phipps are first tour judge advocates stationed at Defense Service Office (DSO) North in Great Lakes. At the office – in their current rotation as defense attorneys – they make a great team. Their ability to work in tandem enabled them to respond swiftly and decisively.

“She had substantial and very obvious blood stains on the front of her jacket, and was bleeding from her face. It turned out that she also had a substantial injury to the top of her head,” said Phipps. “She relayed that she had been mugged and kicked in the head, but didn’t have health insurance, and wasn’t sure what to do.”

They convinced her to get the medical attention she needed. Moore called 911, and clearly communicated important information with authorities.

Meanwhile, Phipps – who previously volunteered with an organization that provides legal assistance to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault – soothed and assured the victim that she was safe.

While waiting for the ambulance to arrive, Moore and Phipps managed to determine approximately where she was mugged, and to get a basic description of the alleged assailant.

“It’s hard for us to characterize this encounter as something praiseworthy or exceptional,” said Phipps. “I think every member of the JAG community would have reacted in the same way and offered the same assistance.”

Cmdr. Chris Williams, executive officer of DSO North, said that Phipps and Moore’s actions are a wonderful example to colleagues near and far.

“We are very proud of them for being calm in a crisis and taking quick action to help someone in need,” he said.

Bravo Zulu, lieutenants, for your compassionate response to a neighbor in trouble, and for connecting her to the help she needed.